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Your Arrest

Clients who have or are about to suffer an arrest share common feelings.  They are upset, angry, confused and often afraid.

I understand.

You are going through a life-changing experience.  You need someone to defend you.  You also need someone who will listen.  An advocate who doesn't listen is a very poor attorney.

 

  • I listen.

 

  • I am available.

 

  • I'm normally available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

  • I can't pick up every call.  I may be in court, in a theater or on the line with another client.  I will call you back at my first opportunity.  Leave messages on both the office and cell phones.

 

 

 

After your arrest

Normally after your arrest will be your arraignment.  If you have been released, you left with a piece of paper that told you when you have to come back.  That's most often your initial arraignment.

During that arraignment, your charges are read, you are given a list of rights and then offered the opportunity to plead guilty, not guilty or no contest.  The judge or magistrate may also provide you with a short continuance to allow you to speak with an attorney.


GUILTY - If you plead guilty one of two things will happen.  Either the judge or magistrate will move directly into sentencing or your case will be sent for a "PSI" or pre-sentence investigation.  If sent for a PSI, you'll get a date to return for your sentencing.

Pleading guilty is a huge step.  It often leads to serious consequences down the road.  Get legal advice.  For example, did you know that if the insurance box on a traffic citation is not properly checked, and you plead guilty without correcting the error, you will face another new driver's license suspension?  Did you know pleading guilty to a crime that results in a suspended license often still allows you to ask for driving privileges?  Get legal advice!


NO CONTEST - A no contest plea means while you do not wish to plead guilty, you do not intend to dispute the facts.  The judge or magistrate will almost certainly make a summary finding of guilty  Either you will then be sentenced or you might be sent for a pre-sentence investigation.


NOT GUILTY - If you plead not guilty, the judge or magistrate will either set a trial or pre-trial date.  If the judge set a trial date at the arraignment, it is imperative you get a hold of legal counsel quickly.  Time is wasting!  Otherwise, you will be given a pretrial date.

About arraignments - click here

Effect of a plea, click here


PRETRIAL - A pretrial is a meeting between the prosecutor and you or your attorney.  During that meeting, your case is discussed.  An attorney knows how to prepare for these meetings.  Read the next column.

 

What I can offer you

Should you decide to hire me, I will provide you with a long list of services.  In a typical case:

 

 

 

 

 

For info on crimes, click here